Don’t Judge an Influencer by Their Handle

In this day and age it can be difficult to not focus completely on someone’s Instagram or social handle. When starting your social journey this is one of the first major choices you have to make: how will I be known? For many it can be a completely pressure-filled situation where there is really no good outcome. You may choose to use your own name like this, or have something more descriptive for your content like this. But the truth is, no matter what you select, brands and advertisers will ultimately judge you by your handle.

So what does this mean? Well, it can mean different things for influencers then it does for brands and advertisers.

The brand/advertiser perspective

Like books, influencers should not be judged by their covers. An influencer is so much more than the available handle they chose at the creation of their channel. Yes, @basicbloggerbitch may not seem like the ideal name for a brand, but that name draws attention and speaks to the brand the blogger is promoting. By looking at the name you may not know that Alex likes to post about food, her community and her friends. Every influencer has branding for one reason or another and if you are wanting to run an influencer campaign you should spend time researching the influencer.

The influencer perspective

Not every company is for you and just because you don’t fit a certain demographic doesn’t mean you should feel the need to change your brand. Your authenticity is your biggest money maker! The right brands are out there and are getting ready to find you.

Working with Find Your Influence is the quickest way for influencers to be discovered by brands and advertisers. Get your journey started by learning more about Find Your Influence today.

Read More

The Men of Influencer Marketing: Timothy Dahl

This is part five of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing.

Social media influencers specialize in a variety of areas. From fitness to fashion and from families to food, influencers share their perspectives on a variety of topics with their followers. However, most of those voices are female. I was shocked to learn that male influencers represent just a fraction of all influencers online.

I decided to dig in to learn more about the men of influencer marketing. I’ve had many fun conversations with some of these men and have even joked with my colleagues about creating “The Men of Influencer Marketing” calendar.

Timothy Dahl is the DIY editor at Popular Mechanics. He’s also an influencer focusing on DIY projects where he often incorporates his family into his content. Timothy was kind enough to connect with me on Friday, October 19 to help me learn more about what he does. The following is a snapshot of our conversation:

Good afternoon, Timothy. You’re the DIY editor at Popular Mechanics, did that start after you became a social media influencer or was that where you kicked things off?

“No, that came after. So, if I want to take it way back, I had a job at “This Old House.” I was working on their online team. From there I launched a couple of my own sites like Charles and Hudson and Built by Kids. That helped raise my profile enough that other folks started to reach out to me, including Popular Mechanics.”

When you go back to ‘This Old House’ where you started off, how did that get started and how did that lead to you becoming a social media influencer?

“‘This Old House’ started in the early 2000’s when social media was really just coming on and at that point it was more about blogging and building your voice that way. For me, I cut my teeth with ‘This Old House’ and it helped me out with the right tools to see what people are searching for and what people are reading. That’s when I started my own sites and, on the social side, I feel like influencers and bloggers jumped into that before the big brands did and got a good hold, which has worked out.”

You are the founder of Charles and Hudson, Built for Kids and Tool Crave. What can you tell me about each of these brands?

“Charles and Hudson is the first one I started in 2005. I had the opportunity when ‘This Old House’ was not taking into account all of the submissions that different home bloggers were sending in so I made Charles and Hudson to show these builds. There was a lot out there but nowhere to just check it all out so that’s how Charles and Hudson started, then it just rolled into things other than DIY.

Built by Kids started seven years ago when we found out we were going to be parents and we learned that crafting isn’t really our thing. My wife and I are really into DIY and we’re really into tools. We wanted to introduce our child to more than just tablets and iPads. That’s how Built by Kids started.

Tool Crave is just another extension of that. It’s really focused on tools and people’s obsession with tools. It’s more so a peek inside some of the more popular makers and builders out there and what tools they actually use.”

I’ve seen your Twitter, Facebook and Instagram pages. Is that where most of your focus is or do you use other social channels too?

“Those channels are where I really focus. I’ve done some work on Pinterest and I definitely use YouTube as well. I have a channel on there for Charles and Hudson and my wife and I recently created a new YouTube channel called The Dahl House. We bought a house last year, and we had the opportunity to do a lot of the things that we haven’t been able to do while renting for the last ten years. The episodes are based around different projects around the house.”

It’s clear that your family is really involved in what you do. How did you get to that point, or did you always know that your family was going to be a part of your content?

“Not really, not until we knew that we were going to parents. My wife started out in fashion so we had our own things but it just made sense because it’s really what our lives are about now. They’re young right now, but you know, we have a pool and a lot of different things that they are growing into around the house so it’s fun to build step stools for them and our oldest son is now passing that on to his younger brother.”

How fun! How old are your kids?

“They are 7 and 6 months old.”

Congratulations, those are fun ages! Across all of your channels and the different platforms you use, how are you building your following?

“To be honest, it’s tough! You have to really dive in. I look into analytics a lot and see what’s popular. I look into demographics, and who’s reading what. All of these different platforms have very different audiences and I want to share content that is best for them, from what they are searching for and what interests them. It’s not just about selling a product, it’s really about telling a story and on the social side there are a lot of different ways to do that.”

Is there a community of DIY influencers where you connect?

”This community has changed a lot since I started doing this. It has obviously grown a lot and people are seeing it as an opportunity to do a lot of different things. I feel it is a collaborative community. A lot of DIY YouTuber’s are collaborating and doing podcasts and sharing different projects. I’m in a couple different, private groups and we share feedback and tips and ways to improve as well as cross -promotion. I’m definitely very collaborative and there’s always enough people to work with and you can kind of find your tribe.”

Tell me about a campaign that really inspired you.

“Most recently I would say my work with Craftsman. What’s interesting about Craftsman is they’ve been around for a long time and they are one of the most iconic American brands but they’ve hit a bit of a rough patch lately because of their tie to a major brick and mortar store that is struggling. Also, in the 2000’s the quality hadn’t been as good as it had been about 50-60 years ago. They obviously rebranded, and partnered with Lowes and came out with a whole new line up of tools, power tools and garage storage. It was fun to work with a brand that everyone has had some kind of touch-point with throughout their life.”

Where do you draw your inspiration?

“It depends on what is happening in my life  at the time. If I’m writing a piece, is it because I am dealing with a crisis after my water heater broke? Then I may get inspired while fixing that and see that there are better alternatives to this big water tank, like a tankless water heater. On the DIY side, that’s where maybe some inspiration comes too, because we have projects here at our house that there are a lot of ways to tackle. What’s inspiring is kind of finding the one that works best for our family that from a design perspective works great and what fits our budget.”

What advice would you give someone who is considering becoming an influencer that you wish you had known when you started?

“If you are thinking about doing this, don’t think about just being an influencer. Think about just sharing things that you really like. The monetization and all the other things will come later. It’s really just about creating your voice, sticking with it and seeing if it resonates with your audience. If you have something interesting, then people will really respond.”

Is there anything more I should know that I didn’t think to ask?

“This work is something that when you’re in it, you’re in it because you love it so much and because you’re having a fun time doing it. It’s hard to go wrong doing something like that. Some people are in it for the wrong reasons and they try it for a bit but then they are out after a few months. You’re able to really create the kind of life you want to live and its fun!”

Read More

Yes, It’s November and We’re Talking Resolutions

No one really starts thinking about their New Year’s resolutions in November. But what if we got a head start so those health-related resolutions were already a habit by January 1? Maybe you’re not ready to prioritize those resolutions just yet but wouldn’t it be great to better understand some of the health and fitness trends for 2019?

Here at Find Your Influence (FYI), we’re always learning, evolving and working to stay ahead of trends. One of the ways we achieve this is through our family of influencers, like Sarah Dussault. Self-described as “The OG Fitness YouTuber,” Sarah has her finger on the pulse of fitness and has offered up some tips, exclusive to Find Your Influence, about how to set yourself up for success in the new year. We’re sharing her valuable insights, so you too can be ahead of the curve.  

Positive Body Image Role Model

Sarah started making Fitness and YouTube videos in 2006. “I feel very lucky to get in early when I did,” she explained. “I was one of the first three fitness channels on YouTube.”

A lot has changed for Sarah since 2006. The social media landscape has grown. Social media influencer has become a profession. (One she’s really good at, by the way.) But that’s not it. Sarah is now the mom of two boys.

“I used to teach a lot of fitness classes and I made fitness a priority in my life,” the Boston mom explains. “I would try to work out five to six times a week. I was training for marathons. Fitness took up a ton of my time because it was something I enjoyed and it was also part of my career. Fast forward to having two kids and it’s still something I enjoy but I struggle to find that time. Instead of working out five to six days a week, I aim for three or four.”

Having a family has changed Sarah’s fitness priorities. Instead of focusing on looking fit enough to feel like she’s a fitness influencer, she shares, “It’s more about being a positive body-image role model. My health is a top priority but not the same way it was before I had kids.”

Forget the Oreos

As we near the holiday season filled with cocktail parties and sweet treats, it’s hard to know where to indulge and where to draw the line. But Sarah has the aha-answer we’ve all been looking for.

“If there are desserts at a holiday party, select the ones you can only have when you’re there at that party. For example, if someone brought Oreos, you can have those any day of the year. But, if your friend made her grandmother’s secret recipe Christmas cookies, when are you going to be able to have those again? Those are worth the splurge,” she says.

But what about family dinners during the holidays? You know you can count on cranberries, potatoes, stuffing and pie. Sarah says to give yourself a break here. “Many people say that you eat your day’s allotment of calories at Thanksgiving dinner, and that’s a lot. But you’re only doing that once.” Don’t beat yourself up when these meals aren’t a regular occurrence.

Fitness Trends with Friends

Once the gifts are opened, our focus often shifts to New Year’s resolutions. Some of the most common resolutions involve losing weight, eating healthier or going to the gym. What will the fitness and health trends be in 2019?

“I think group exercise is definitely going to be big again,” said Sarah. “People love to sweat with other people because it’s motivating. There’s also something to be said about being held accountable when you sign up for a class.”

But not everyone has the budget or access to a gym. Instead of making excuses, focus your attention instead on having a few essential pieces of equipment at home that will set you up for a good workout. There are apps, or Sarah’s fitness videos on YouTube, that can set you up for success.

A healthy lifestyle is often easier to stay committed to when your family or friends join in. “If you have friends and you love going out to dinner together, maybe instead of dinner, everybody decides, ‘let’s all go to a class at a gym’,” Sarah suggests. Accountability for a workout or a healthy meal with a friend or a partner is important because you’re less inclined to cancel.

Keep it Simple

What healthy eating plans will be trending next year? It may feel like Keto was the health conversation in 2018, however Sarah thinks it’s only getting started. “Personally, I’m not a huge fan of any diet that says bacon is better than fruit. That’s not a diet for me. But people find results. I think it might be a great way to jump-start a weight loss program but I don’t think it’s a long-term solution,” she says.

Sarah also thinks eating less meat is also going to be popular. “People are acknowledging the health benefits of a vegan diet and also the effects it has on the environment.”

When it comes to healthy meal planning for yourself and your family, the goal should always be to keep it simple. “I keep my recipes basic and simple because that’s all I really have time for these days,” explains Sarah as she gets ready to walk to pick up her son from school. “I’ve become a fan of roasting vegetables and potatoes and then have a standard protein that’s easy and simple. You can marinate the protein overnight or cook using a slow cooker.”

Be Basic

When it comes time to make those resolutions, be smart and set yourself up for success.  Be basic, not extra. For Sarah, her goal is to work out three to four days a week which isn’t always possible to do. “When I do hit my goal, I feel so good about myself!” Sarah says emphatically. ‘If my goal was to work out five times a week I would constantly be disappointed.”

Stay in-the-know and ahead of trends with FYI, from your New Year’s health resolutions to the latest consumer trends. If Sarah is “The Og Fitness YouTuber,” then Find Your Influence is “The OG Influencer Marketing Solution.” Stick with us and we will keep you informed so you’re not the last person still doing aerobics with Jane Fonda – unless it works for you, we won’t judge.

 

Read More

The Men of Influencer Marketing: Alan Lawrence

This is part four of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing.

Social media influencers are everywhere. Seriously. Everywhere. But have you looked closely at who these people really are? At Find Your Influence (FYI), we have more than 100,000 influencers who have opted in to our network to be discovered by brands around the world.

When I first started at FYI in August 2018, I was shocked by how many women are part of the FYI network. 84 percent are female. That leaves just 16 percent of the network led by men.  

Who are these men? What makes them so successful? Why do they do what they do?

On Monday, October 15, I spoke with Alan Lawrence of That Dad Blog to learn more about his beautiful family and what inspired him to start his blog. What follows is my conversation with Alan:

Tell me about yourself, Alan. How did you get started as a blogger? Is this a full time role or a side hustle?

“When my second youngest son was born with Down Syndrome, it was pretty traumatic for me. In the following months I realized it was something that was more of a blessing than a negative. I felt guilty about that. When he was born and I was looking for different resources available about Down Syndrome, I noticed there weren’t a lot of positive articles available, especially coming from dads. I wanted to be part of the good news. Years ago when you would search for information about Down Syndrome it was all negative news. I wanted to create something different that would rise above all that to show that while there are some challenges, there is also a lot of joy.

As time went on, I started to feel more comfortable talking about my personal interests and my family of six kids. The idea of big families in today’s society is really where I’ve found my niche today.

Chick-Fil-A was the first brand to reach out to me and asked if I would be interested in getting involved in a campaign. And I thought it would be fun to try. It felt really natural and they liked the content. From there I really started thinking about putting my foot in the influencer realm. It’s really just gone from there.

When my son was born, I was working full time in the marketing department for a running shoe company. I’m also a photographer and a graphic designer.  I had the opportunity to create a couple of fun photo series with my kids that went viral. The last two weeks actually have become a little bit more full time for me on the social side for me.”

Is the blog where this all started? How have you transitioned to other social platforms?

“Currently I’m using my blog, Instagram, Facebook and YouTube. Instagram is really where it took off. My blog and Instagram were started at the same time but it was the photos of my son Will flying that really caught everyone’s attention and gave me the thought of taking this onto a bigger storytelling platform. Once Will was born, I wanted to share my Instagram for more than just personal platform but to help other dads who may be going through the same challenges with special needs kids as I was.

As things started to grow on Instagram and my blog, I started using Facebook. In 2015 I started using YouTube as a way to vlog. I really like telling stories through video.”

You’re active and engaged across four channels. Where do you find the time?

“I’m still trying to manage the time between being a good dad, working full time and then doing this on the side. I’ve now gone part time in my other role because it finally got to the time where the brand collaborations and partnerships are able to float us financially. I’m slowly stepping away from a job that I really loved to do something that I love even more. I’m walking with faith into this new direction in my career and hopefully take it to the point where I can fully step away from my other job and put more time into this. “

I can hear your passion and enthusiasm for this! In order to build something so strong across all of these platforms, you have to be committed to your followers. Tell me about them and how you engage with them.

“It’s kind of funny that my accounts are called ‘That Dad Blog’ so you would think the majority of the people who follow me are men but it’s 90 percent women. I work in partnership with my wife quite a bit. I feel like I’m a lot more open than the average male in my demographic would be as far as sharing personal feelings. I find myself reaching out to my wife to find out what she thinks, from a female perspective. I really appreciate her opinion and it’s valuable knowing that 90 percent of my followers are women.

As far as the interactions with the men who follow me, it’s very personal. I feel like men feel too vulnerable in sharing and putting themselves out there. That’s one thing that I’ve tried to help with, to let men know that they have a voice out there. Women are doing a great job but we also need to talk about the father’s feelings and create support groups through social media to be able to help dads express their feelings and be better dads. We need to learn from each other.

There are a lot of personal struggles I share, specifically related to having a child with special needs. I shared about how it was really hard, and about how I was not happy at first to know that my son had Down Syndrome. I didn’t want to sugarcoat that, I wanted to be honest. A lot of people responded and appreciated the honesty. People want to know the good news but finding a cadence and the balance of the good and the bad is important. Being honest and feeling comfortable putting yourself out there was a real struggle for me at the start. It’s become much easier for me as I began trusting the people who follow us after having open, honest and real conversations with them.’

Since it’s called “That Dad Blog,” tell me a little about your family.

“We have six children ranging from 16 to 3. They’re all so different from one another. My oldest, my daughter is kind of a shy, really intelligent introvert. Her brother, my oldest son, is very outgoing, charismatic and has a really great sense of humor. Our second oldest son is a mix between his older siblings. He’s in that awkward 11-year old stage right now where he’s trying to figure himself out. He really loves his younger brothers and has a good heart but leans more toward the shy side. My daughter Ali struggles with weight but is a really confident girl who likes to take over my Instagram Stories sometimes. I think sassy is a good way to describe her. It’s the cutest thing. It’s kind of created a separate following. People keep asking me to have her create her own account but I think she’s too young right now. My two younger boys Wil (5), who happens to have Down Syndrome, and Rockwell (3). I tell most of my stories around my two youngest because it’s kind of this dynamic about my son who has Down Syndrome and his brother who is this “average” kid. I think that’s the dynamic that people really enjoy watching because it’s a big family in general but also watching my younger two grow up together.

My oldest daughter doesn’t really like to be in pictures, she’s kind of a private person so I respect that with her. Ali is very open to most anything, she wants to be a YouTube star herself. My two older boys are timid but they are open to it.

My wife is the glue that holds it all together. She’s the one who keeps me sane and on track. She’s the rock. We’ve been married for 23 years now.”

Along the way, you’ve worked with different brands. Tell me what you’re looking for in a brand partner.

“I’m looking for something that I would actually use or something that can help to make my life better. At the start, when I was kind of new to it, I agreed to promote some brands that ultimately didn’t feel natural. I did one for a food brand that I wasn’t really interested in and didn’t end up feeling was a good fit but I guess I more or less did it for the experience. It didn’t flow right and my followers could tell it wasn’t authentic.

Doing things that feel right, that we actually use and that we can get behind are what we look for.”

Are there other dad bloggers who you follow?

The biggest one I follow is Father of Daughters. He is a great writer and I love his sense of humor.  Him and his wife have a fun dynamic. I know he works part time along with doing his social media so I can relate to that challenge.

I feel like there’s not a strong community of dad bloggers that is easy to find. There is a small network of dads that I’ve found through their outreach or I’ve stumbled upon through Instagram search. This smaller network includes dads of kids with special needs that I’ve become friends with. I’m friends with a lot of mommy bloggers whom I speak with a lot but not a lot of dads. I don’t mean for that to sound terrible but it’s something I can be a voice in helping to change in some way so dads can feel comfortable sharing their opinions too.”

 

Read More

The Men of Influencer Marketing: Jorge Guevara

This is part three of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing.

Social media influencers can have followers anywhere on the globe. Many of Jorge Guevara’s followers are from South America. Jorge was kind enough to grant us an interview as we continue to learn from the men of influencer marketing.

We want to better understand these men. What inspires them? What are their keys to success? What do they wish they knew when they started?

On Friday, October 19, I spoke with Jorge Guevara to learn more about how he has cultivated his audience. What follows is my conversation with Jorge:

Hi Jorge. I’ve seen your website and your Instagram but what more can you tell me about yourself?  What does it mean to you to be a social media influencer?

“The way I got started was in fitness modeling. Fitness modeling is very saturated now and I felt like I could do so much more than working out and buying meal plans. I actually had a good opportunity in Los Angeles to shoot with a big time fashion photographer and he pretty much opened my eyes and my mind that I could do so much more than just fitness. After that photo shoot, that’s when I figured out that’s what I really wanted to focus on. I started switching my entire image on social media toward high fashion. I worked with different photographers in Chicago, LA and Miami.

It was really tough in the beginning because the audience I had built over the last few years was very fitness-oriented and when I started posting a lot of fashion photos, I began losing a lot of engagement. It took me some time to gain it back and reach a new audience but that’s what the transformation looked like.

To be an influencer you have to find your niche and where you want to motivate people. For me it’s just being motivated in all aspects of your life from fitness, the way you dress, what you eat, taking care of your family and travelling. As an influencer I love to not only show off the brands that I work with and the content I create but also for people who may not have the opportunity to travel, I like to share my photos and videos to share my experiences.”

It’s not often you hear of influencers switching lanes like you did from fitness to fashion. What did that transition look and feel like for you?

“The whole process of going from fitness to fashion lifestyle blogger was very tough. In the beginning people were not used to it so I did lose a lot of followers and engagement. For me it was something I needed to do for myself. To go to high-end fashion brands was hard because my audience was more fitness-oriented. I want to say it took about a year through different brand collaborations and tagging pages on Instagram and although it’s taken time, I’m growing as an influencer. I’m a micro-influencer so I still have a long way to go to catch up. Some people have been doing this for more than ten years.”

Being an influencer is a concept that’s relatively new. How do you define being an influencer to friends and family who may not have been exposed to influencer marketing yet?

“As an influencer, you’re promoting a product or service that you believe in and you want your followers to follow up on. I only promote products or services that I’ve used and truly believe in. I don’t collaborate just to get paid. I do it because I believe in the brand or it’s something I’m going to wear. The easiest way to explain it is it’s something you believe in and you think it would benefit them too.”

What do you know about your audience who follow you?

“I have a big South American audience because I’m from Columbia. Even though I reside in the U.S. now,  I’ve always had a big Latin audience follow me because they can relate to me. I do a lot of videos in Spanish. Anywhere from 24-45 year olds make up my audience. Today that’s about 55% male and 45% female. As you start working with other brands you begin to gain more followers who like your content and that brand.”

As you’ve built your social media following, was there one thing you can point to that came ‘easy’ to you?

“Nothing’s easy. For me, I’ve been lucky to be photogenic so creating content has been fairly easy. Staying consistent with content has been one of the hardest things because you have to post almost every single day. Nothing has been easy because I’m continuing the growth phase in this saturated market where you have to do things that people are not doing. It’s important to me to focus on more aspects of life than just fashion, like travel too. I’ll always have fitness to incorporate in because that’s a huge part of my life that I want to promote, just not as much as I used to before.”

Is there a community of fitness or lifestyle influencers that you’re collaborating with on a regular basis?

“I’ve seen more collaboration with male influencers since it isn’t as big yet as the community of female influencers. For guys, we do a lot of collaboration on events or brands that may be looking for another guy. I’m always looking to help other people out because I know they would look out for me if they had the opportunity. At the end of the day it’s all about helping each other out and creating something different.”

Is there a brand that you aspire to work with?

“That’s easy, it’s Tom Ford. As I’ve grown as an influencer I’ve made so much progress with the brands I’ve worked with. I started with the small mom and pops and on to the smaller and medium brands. It’s getting to the point where the quality of content you’re putting out there and the brands you start tagging begin to notice you and inquire about you. I did a campaign with Lucky last year that was huge for me. It put me on the map for brands who are on the same level as them. It really helped me push my name and image to another level.”

Read More

The Men of Influencer Marketing: Brian Morr

This is part two of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing. 

At Find Your Influence (FYI), we have more than 100,000 influencers who have opted in to our network to be discovered by brands around the world. Taking a closer look at the FYI network, 84 percent are female. That leaves 16 percent of the network led by men.

Who are these men? What makes them so successful? How have they built their personal brands?

On Wednesday, September 26, I spoke with Brian Morr, a menswear and lifestyle influencer based in New York City. Brian’s blog, Sink the Sun, chronicles his life and brand experiences in the Big Apple. What follows is our conversation:

It’s great to meet you, Brian. Tell me more about you. How did you get started in the world of influencer marketing?

“I currently work at a hotel in SoHo, in New York City. I’ve been working there for five years now. I’m originally from Long Island. Right after college I went back to live back home with my parents close to the beach so I started taking photos of the beach, myself at the beach and then myself in the city when I got my job in SoHo. It kind of just took off from there. There wasn’t  a point in time when I gained a lot of followers, it just happened organically over time, which was pretty cool. I’m often asked for tips or tricks of how it happened but it just happened on it’s own. I guess people liked the things I was posting, so I thought, ‘Okay, I’ll run with this.”

How has Instagram worked for you? Are you using other social channels too?

I mainly use Instagram for collaborations, ads and things like that. I do have a blog too. I created the blog after the Instagram following took off because I wondered if Instagram may only be a fad that I would still have everything available on my blog. It’s a great outlet to get all of my thoughts out. I was an English major in college so I use that to my advantage in creating content like blog posts.”

I’ve spoken to a few influencers and a common thread is that many of you seem to have earned your degrees in English or Communications. This has proven helpful when creating unique content.

“That content, that message, It’s what we want to say to our audience and it’s very important how we word everything. It’s been really helpful to me to have that background.”

Let’s talk about your followers. Do they all fit into the same general category or different categories? How would you describe them?

“The majority of my followers, I think 80 percent, are male. I do a lot of men’s fashion and promote a lot of men’s brands on Instagram. I’ve done a lot of collaborations with alcohol brands too, which may be more appealing to guys. The demographic of my followers is somewhat similar to myself, although I do have 20 percent female following, but I’m geared more generally to men. My following is more New York-based than anything. It’s cool because I see a lot of people in the city that have recognized me. It’s pretty cool how this whole platform came to be and came to be something great for me.”

You mentioned engaging with your followers. Aside from them recognizing you on the street, what does your engagement with your followers look like?

“I do get emails here and there about style tips and questions. They are really few and far between. I do get a ton of direct messages, which I think is a lot more than other influencer friends who I’ve spoken to. Most of the  stories I put on Instagram are pretty relatable. I do get comments on my photos but more often direct messages about my stories or my style or where I’ve gotten something. I usually wake up each morning with 30-35 new direct messages. And I do answer all of them. I think this helps my engagement grow.”

You mentioned that you also work in a hotel. Is your role as in influencer your side hustle or are you looking to make that your primary hustle?

“It’s definitely something I’m thinking of doing soon. My current job at the hotel doesn’t interfere with the influencer side of my life. They’re very helpful when it comes to needing days off and they even let me take photos in the hotel. Right now I work 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the hotel and then have the rest of my day available to dedicate to shooting. I have the weekends off so I spend much of my weekend taking photos and creating content. It is pretty crazy, it’s two full-time jobs at this point. It’s awesome that I could take a hobby and turn it into something greater, turning it into something I love.”

You’ve worked with many different brands. What brands have been your favorites and why?

“I did a campaign with Heineken. With them I went Ultra in Miami and Coachella. It was like a yearly campaign which was really cool. That was more geared toward male influencers, all about Heineken, all about beer.

I did a few things with Timex and they were really cool to work with. I love watches and enjoy the opportunities I’ve had to work with different watch brands.”

What brand has resonated the most, or had the most engagement with your followers?

“I did a cool campaign with Reebok over the summer that got a lot of comments and messages. It was a new shoe line made from renewable material. Those pictures came out great and it was an all around awesome campaign. I heard from the agency that the brand itself did well from it.”

What, or whom, inspires you?

“Moving to New York City a few years ago has inspired me to get up and go and do this for a living. Living the New York City life has inspired pretty much all of my work. Everyday I see people hustling and doing everything they can to survive and thrive here. That’s really inspiring to me.”

In the world of influencer marketing, it appears to be heavily female. As a male influencer, tell me about the community of influencers you engage with. How would you describe that community?

“I definitely think women have the upper hand at this, which is not a bad thing at all. Women have started this influencer marketing revolution and that’s awesome. Male influencing is a whole different ball game. We have our own little group. When I go to events, I’m often asked if I know many women influencers. I really don’t because every event I go to for a brand is primarily a male event. There are a ton of new influencers popping up every week which is awesome. More competition is more incentive to work harder. For every one male influencer there is probably ten female influencers fighting for jobs. I think it’s pretty cool that guys have caught on to it and are now able to do it for a living.”

Read More

How to Win Fans and Influence Consumers: Influencer Marketing Best Practices

Influencer

By: Courtney Gibb

When it comes to finding influencers, what should you look for? Someone clever? Sure. Someone in-the-know? You bet.  An industry thought leader? Absolutely.

But what’s the difference between a know it all and someone who’s in the know? Is your ideal influencer the type of person everyone turns to for advice and guidance, or are they a thought leader known for the ability to make every person feel like they were the only one in the room?

Truth be told, influencers come in all shapes and sizes, and choosing the right influencers is just one thing to keep in mind when you start planning your next influencer marketing campaign.

As one of the hottest trends going, influencer marketing serves as the bridge between advocate and digital marketing. Instead of focusing on an entire general audience, influencer marketing works with key individuals to heighten the impact of a brand, product or message in a more direct and organic way. In order to be successful marketers must It means seeing the potential and know who the important influencers are, how to target them and what the campaign’s impact will be.

That’s where influencers come in – by leveraging an influencer, you’re speaking directly to their followers/audience. 74% of consumers say third party endorsements from influencers impact their purchase decisions, and 81% do independent research on products and services beyond brand-generated content.

It’s critical to get your brand’s message out where the consumers are in order to increase brand awareness, brand affinity and your target consumer’s intent-to-purchase.  That’s where influencer marketing comes in. So now what?

To help you plot and plan your next (best) influencer marketing campaign, follow along on our blog each week as we explain the following influencer marketing best practices.

  1. Build manageable campaign deadlines
  2. Set campaign goals to measure success
  3. Fully integrate your influencer marketing
  4. Pick the right social platform
  5. Find the right influencers
  6. Communicate frequently
  7. Provide feedback to your influencers
  8. Scale, and repeat

Stay tuned for more at blog.findyourinfluence.com. Do you have any tips or tricks that have made your influencer marketing campaigns successful? Let us know!

 

Read More

5 Easy Ways to Get Blogging Topic Ideas

rsz_5_ways_to_get_blogging_ideas

 

Some weeks content ideas and blog posts flow from your mind to your fingertips like water through a Brita. Cherish those weeks. They feel like a million bucks. And then there’s the days, weeks or even months where you feel like you have nothing interesting to say, nothing new to give and no desire to write. Don’t panic and don’t be too hard on yourself. It happens to the best of us. In fact the syndrome is so popular there’s a name for it: writer’s block.

 

Yes, what you’re experiencing is good old-fashioned writer’s block and it’s no excuse to stop writing. If you’re having trouble writing your next blog post, don’t simply leave your readers hanging until the blogging spirit moves you. Suck it up and start writing! It’s the only cure. Here are a few quick tips to get you started.

 

1. Use a content idea generator

There are quite a few out there, but the HubSpot blog topic generator tool is our favorite (and it’s free). Simply fill in a few relevant words and the tool will spit out 5 unique blog headlines that are totally awesome.

 

2. Get lost in a Twitter rabbit hole

This tip is one of our favorites because we call it work but it feels like fun. Log in to Twitter and scroll through posts looking for a topic that interests you, click on the relevant hashtag. Then scroll through those posts until you find a post that interests you, click on a new relevant hashtag. And then keep going. Keep clicking hashtags until you stumble upon the golden topic you’ve been looking for.

(more…)

Read More

Influencers: How to Launch Social Media Campaigns

rsz_how_to_launch_a_social_campaignWhat we’ve got here is a case of the middle child syndrome. There’s a ton of content out there for novice bloggers — the youngest child has to be coddled afterall. And superstar bloggers have paved the way for their siblings and our now making it to all of the grownup events like conferences, meetups and more. But what about the middle children? Is there any educational content for them?

 

Well tweener bloggers, this is an article for you. If you’ve been blogging consistently for a while and have seen your readership grow, you’ve probably got this blog thing down. But how do you turn your blog into a personal brand? How do you become an influencer?

 

A great way to take your blog to the next step is to start <thinking like a marketer> and launch a social media campaign. Now before you get overwhelmed with all the overused marketing jargon (strategy, metrics and optimize – oh my!), take a deep breath and read this easy step-by-step guide to launching your first social media campaign for your personal brand.

 

1. Establish a specific goal

First things first, why do you want to launch a social campaign? To gain more followers? To get links back to your blog? To get email subscribers? Figure out what you want out of this campaign and be as specific as possible. Try to have only one goal for this first campaign. Write your goal down.

 

2. Decide on a metric

Once you have a goal, you have to figure out how to measure it — otherwise how will you know if your social campaign worked? This is where your marketer hat needs to come in. We wrote a <great blog about metrics> a while back that may help. Buf if those metrics seem too complicated, keep it simple. You can focus on something easy like new likes or a boost in traffic. Just make sure it’s something that can actually be measured. “Spreading your brand voice” might sound good in theory, but how will you know if you actually did this effectively? Be specific and pick a measurement.

3. Write a one-page proposal

This doesn’t need to be anything fancy. You don’t need to get out a spreadsheet and calculator and write a 15-page report. Keep it to about one page and include these things:

 

  1. Goal
  2. Measurement
  3. Purpose and background information
  4. Details about your brand
  5. Summary of the steps and events
  6. Timeline of key milestones including a start and end date

 

4. Gather assets and create content

Now that you have a solid plan in place, get everything you need ready. Write the social media posts, write the blog posts, gather images, PROOFREAD, prepare your survey or newsletter, set up a promo code, set up your analytics. Prepare as much as you can before you actually launch so that things can go smoothly. Keep it all in one folder, schedule what you can and get excited.

 

5. Launch your social media campaign and do a post-mortem

Ready, set, launch! Once you launch your campaign, don’t change your plan. Don’t decide mid way through that you think newsletter signups would be a better measurement than likes. Don’t decide at the end to throw in a giveaway. Just stick to the plan, interact with your followers, promote your campaign and try to enjoy it. And try not to obsess over your analytics. Some marketers prefer not to check them until the very end.

 

Once it’s all over, you should do what marketers, advertisers and brands like to call a “post-mortem”(uplifting, huh?). It simply means gather all of your data and spend some time thinking or talking about what went well and what could be improved next time. It’s a good idea to turn your metrics into percentages. For instance, 50 new likes might not sound like that much but if that’s a 30% increase in likes, you might consider it a success.

 

Try to gather some insights for your metrics, write down what you think you should have done better and give yourself a pat on the back for doing such a good job!

 

Once you’ve made it past #5, it’s time to start all over again using what you learned to launch an even better campaign the next time. Use your data from your first campaign as a baseline. In your next campaign, you should try to improve them!

Read More

7 Reasons why bloggers should partner with brands

Creating a blog is a bit like creating a piece of art. You worked hard, you passion went into it. The idea of letting someone else impact your creation is equal parts annoying and terrifying. We get it. But if you have great content, there are a ton of reasons to share your blogging love and partner with brands and advertisers you already adore.

 

Don’t believe us? Check out this handy infographic the team at Find your Influence created!

Already working with an influencer? Share this infographic with your favorite blogger who never partners up.

 

bloggers info

Read More