The Men of Influencer Marketing: Jorge Guevara

This is part three of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing.

Social media influencers can have followers anywhere on the globe. Many of Jorge Guevara’s followers are from South America. Jorge was kind enough to grant us an interview as we continue to learn from the men of influencer marketing.

We want to better understand these men. What inspires them? What are their keys to success? What do they wish they knew when they started?

On Friday, October 19, I spoke with Jorge Guevara to learn more about how he has cultivated his audience. What follows is my conversation with Jorge:

Hi Jorge. I’ve seen your website and your Instagram but what more can you tell me about yourself?  What does it mean to you to be a social media influencer?

“The way I got started was in fitness modeling. Fitness modeling is very saturated now and I felt like I could do so much more than working out and buying meal plans. I actually had a good opportunity in Los Angeles to shoot with a big time fashion photographer and he pretty much opened my eyes and my mind that I could do so much more than just fitness. After that photo shoot, that’s when I figured out that’s what I really wanted to focus on. I started switching my entire image on social media toward high fashion. I worked with different photographers in Chicago, LA and Miami.

It was really tough in the beginning because the audience I had built over the last few years was very fitness-oriented and when I started posting a lot of fashion photos, I began losing a lot of engagement. It took me some time to gain it back and reach a new audience but that’s what the transformation looked like.

To be an influencer you have to find your niche and where you want to motivate people. For me it’s just being motivated in all aspects of your life from fitness, the way you dress, what you eat, taking care of your family and travelling. As an influencer I love to not only show off the brands that I work with and the content I create but also for people who may not have the opportunity to travel, I like to share my photos and videos to share my experiences.”

It’s not often you hear of influencers switching lanes like you did from fitness to fashion. What did that transition look and feel like for you?

“The whole process of going from fitness to fashion lifestyle blogger was very tough. In the beginning people were not used to it so I did lose a lot of followers and engagement. For me it was something I needed to do for myself. To go to high-end fashion brands was hard because my audience was more fitness-oriented. I want to say it took about a year through different brand collaborations and tagging pages on Instagram and although it’s taken time, I’m growing as an influencer. I’m a micro-influencer so I still have a long way to go to catch up. Some people have been doing this for more than ten years.”

Being an influencer is a concept that’s relatively new. How do you define being an influencer to friends and family who may not have been exposed to influencer marketing yet?

“As an influencer, you’re promoting a product or service that you believe in and you want your followers to follow up on. I only promote products or services that I’ve used and truly believe in. I don’t collaborate just to get paid. I do it because I believe in the brand or it’s something I’m going to wear. The easiest way to explain it is it’s something you believe in and you think it would benefit them too.”

What do you know about your audience who follow you?

“I have a big South American audience because I’m from Columbia. Even though I reside in the U.S. now,  I’ve always had a big Latin audience follow me because they can relate to me. I do a lot of videos in Spanish. Anywhere from 24-45 year olds make up my audience. Today that’s about 55% male and 45% female. As you start working with other brands you begin to gain more followers who like your content and that brand.”

As you’ve built your social media following, was there one thing you can point to that came ‘easy’ to you?

“Nothing’s easy. For me, I’ve been lucky to be photogenic so creating content has been fairly easy. Staying consistent with content has been one of the hardest things because you have to post almost every single day. Nothing has been easy because I’m continuing the growth phase in this saturated market where you have to do things that people are not doing. It’s important to me to focus on more aspects of life than just fashion, like travel too. I’ll always have fitness to incorporate in because that’s a huge part of my life that I want to promote, just not as much as I used to before.”

Is there a community of fitness or lifestyle influencers that you’re collaborating with on a regular basis?

“I’ve seen more collaboration with male influencers since it isn’t as big yet as the community of female influencers. For guys, we do a lot of collaboration on events or brands that may be looking for another guy. I’m always looking to help other people out because I know they would look out for me if they had the opportunity. At the end of the day it’s all about helping each other out and creating something different.”

Is there a brand that you aspire to work with?

“That’s easy, it’s Tom Ford. As I’ve grown as an influencer I’ve made so much progress with the brands I’ve worked with. I started with the small mom and pops and on to the smaller and medium brands. It’s getting to the point where the quality of content you’re putting out there and the brands you start tagging begin to notice you and inquire about you. I did a campaign with Lucky last year that was huge for me. It put me on the map for brands who are on the same level as them. It really helped me push my name and image to another level.”

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The Men of Influencer Marketing: Brian Morr

This is part two of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing. 

At Find Your Influence (FYI), we have more than 100,000 influencers who have opted in to our network to be discovered by brands around the world. Taking a closer look at the FYI network, 84 percent are female. That leaves 16 percent of the network led by men.

Who are these men? What makes them so successful? How have they built their personal brands?

On Wednesday, September 26, I spoke with Brian Morr, a menswear and lifestyle influencer based in New York City. Brian’s blog, Sink the Sun, chronicles his life and brand experiences in the Big Apple. What follows is our conversation:

It’s great to meet you, Brian. Tell me more about you. How did you get started in the world of influencer marketing?

“I currently work at a hotel in SoHo, in New York City. I’ve been working there for five years now. I’m originally from Long Island. Right after college I went back to live back home with my parents close to the beach so I started taking photos of the beach, myself at the beach and then myself in the city when I got my job in SoHo. It kind of just took off from there. There wasn’t  a point in time when I gained a lot of followers, it just happened organically over time, which was pretty cool. I’m often asked for tips or tricks of how it happened but it just happened on it’s own. I guess people liked the things I was posting, so I thought, ‘Okay, I’ll run with this.”

How has Instagram worked for you? Are you using other social channels too?

I mainly use Instagram for collaborations, ads and things like that. I do have a blog too. I created the blog after the Instagram following took off because I wondered if Instagram may only be a fad that I would still have everything available on my blog. It’s a great outlet to get all of my thoughts out. I was an English major in college so I use that to my advantage in creating content like blog posts.”

I’ve spoken to a few influencers and a common thread is that many of you seem to have earned your degrees in English or Communications. This has proven helpful when creating unique content.

“That content, that message, It’s what we want to say to our audience and it’s very important how we word everything. It’s been really helpful to me to have that background.”

Let’s talk about your followers. Do they all fit into the same general category or different categories? How would you describe them?

“The majority of my followers, I think 80 percent, are male. I do a lot of men’s fashion and promote a lot of men’s brands on Instagram. I’ve done a lot of collaborations with alcohol brands too, which may be more appealing to guys. The demographic of my followers is somewhat similar to myself, although I do have 20 percent female following, but I’m geared more generally to men. My following is more New York-based than anything. It’s cool because I see a lot of people in the city that have recognized me. It’s pretty cool how this whole platform came to be and came to be something great for me.”

You mentioned engaging with your followers. Aside from them recognizing you on the street, what does your engagement with your followers look like?

“I do get emails here and there about style tips and questions. They are really few and far between. I do get a ton of direct messages, which I think is a lot more than other influencer friends who I’ve spoken to. Most of the  stories I put on Instagram are pretty relatable. I do get comments on my photos but more often direct messages about my stories or my style or where I’ve gotten something. I usually wake up each morning with 30-35 new direct messages. And I do answer all of them. I think this helps my engagement grow.”

You mentioned that you also work in a hotel. Is your role as in influencer your side hustle or are you looking to make that your primary hustle?

“It’s definitely something I’m thinking of doing soon. My current job at the hotel doesn’t interfere with the influencer side of my life. They’re very helpful when it comes to needing days off and they even let me take photos in the hotel. Right now I work 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the hotel and then have the rest of my day available to dedicate to shooting. I have the weekends off so I spend much of my weekend taking photos and creating content. It is pretty crazy, it’s two full-time jobs at this point. It’s awesome that I could take a hobby and turn it into something greater, turning it into something I love.”

You’ve worked with many different brands. What brands have been your favorites and why?

“I did a campaign with Heineken. With them I went Ultra in Miami and Coachella. It was like a yearly campaign which was really cool. That was more geared toward male influencers, all about Heineken, all about beer.

I did a few things with Timex and they were really cool to work with. I love watches and enjoy the opportunities I’ve had to work with different watch brands.”

What brand has resonated the most, or had the most engagement with your followers?

“I did a cool campaign with Reebok over the summer that got a lot of comments and messages. It was a new shoe line made from renewable material. Those pictures came out great and it was an all around awesome campaign. I heard from the agency that the brand itself did well from it.”

What, or whom, inspires you?

“Moving to New York City a few years ago has inspired me to get up and go and do this for a living. Living the New York City life has inspired pretty much all of my work. Everyday I see people hustling and doing everything they can to survive and thrive here. That’s really inspiring to me.”

In the world of influencer marketing, it appears to be heavily female. As a male influencer, tell me about the community of influencers you engage with. How would you describe that community?

“I definitely think women have the upper hand at this, which is not a bad thing at all. Women have started this influencer marketing revolution and that’s awesome. Male influencing is a whole different ball game. We have our own little group. When I go to events, I’m often asked if I know many women influencers. I really don’t because every event I go to for a brand is primarily a male event. There are a ton of new influencers popping up every week which is awesome. More competition is more incentive to work harder. For every one male influencer there is probably ten female influencers fighting for jobs. I think it’s pretty cool that guys have caught on to it and are now able to do it for a living.”

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The Men of Influencer Marketing: Parker York Smith

This is part one of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing. 

It’s not often you find an industry where women have a commanding position over men. At Find Your Influence (FYI), we have more than 100,000 influencers who have opted in to our network to be discovered by brands around the world. Taking a closer look at the FYI network, 84 percent are female. That leaves 16 percent of the network led by men.

Who are these men? What makes them so successful? How have they built their personal brands?

This is part one of an ongoing series where we will come to know more about the men of influencer marketing.

On Monday, September 24, I spoke with Parker York Smith, a fashion and lifestyle influencer known as The LookSmith. What follows is our conversation:

Hey Parker! Tell me a little about yourself. How did you get started as an influencer?

“I started out a little over three years ago, it was like mid-2015. I was living in Los Angeles. My now wife, then girlfriend, saw me struggling trying to become an actor. I wasn’t enjoying it that much. She knew that I had gone to school for journalism and that I loved fashion. She suggested that I start taking photos of my outfits and putting them on the internet with my thought process about why I put it together the way I did. I had always been a style person even when it wasn’t my career. I started a website, went on to Instagram and started posting photos. There were a few people who were doing it already but not a good amount. My wife had met someone who was doing it full time who inspired her to even realize it was a career path. She encouraged me to start doing it and I did and little by little it turned into something. I’m fortunate being in Los Angeles because there are a lot of brands. It felt easy to me when I started to partner with some smaller brands early on and develop their content catalogue while also allowing me the opportunity to learn the ropes of fashion branding and the content creation side which is what I’ve grown to love. From three years ago to now it’s been a steady grind of lots of content, lots of partnerships, lots of ups and downs with social media. It’s provided me with incredible opportunities that I will always love and appreciate. I’m willing to admit that it can be a bit of a grind at times. I got my foot in the door at the right time when it wasn’t something that was super saturated.”

Tell me about the platforms you use today. Do you focus on just one platform or multiple?

“I originally started with Instagram and a website, cooperatively. I wanted to write a blog because I enjoy writing – my background and my degree is in journalism. Instagram became so essential and it was such an easy opportunity to showcase the visual side of everything. About a year ago, I started doing video because it really allows me to share my personality and my knowledge and hopefully inspire people to start to take themselves more seriously in terms of their style and confidence. I’ve been really loving video and am realizing that is where I want to end up in the future.”

Do you have any plans to expand across other social platforms?

“I have a Twitter page that I love but it’s just a way for me to push content from other channels. It’s really there as another outlet but not really a focus. I love shoes and Twitter is where I do a lot of research about upcoming releases or collaborations. Snapchat is on my phone but I don’t really use it. With the introduction of Instagram stories it made more sense for me to create videos where my audience already was as opposed to cultivating an entirely new audience.”

Tell me a little about your followers.

“My followers are 80 percent male. Mainly 24-34. Mostly American but a big chunk in London too. I’m starting to build a decent audience in other parts of the world too, thanks to YouTube, which is really exciting. Guys like me who enjoy style but aren’t trying to be wearing the most crisp suit and tie everyday. It’s more about expressing yourself through different style genres.”

Having followers is great but engagement is what really matters. How do your followers engage with you?

“As it relates to engagement, my biggest focus is to have a group of truly engaged, highly interested followers. It doesn’t have to be a gigantic number but engagement is important, I want my content seen because it makes it more exciting for me to create more when I know that it’s out there being seen by the most people. At the same time, I’m a strong believer in interacting with my followers. I answer all of my DM’s about my content or questions related to style in general. One of my favorite things is that I’ll have guys send me photos of them getting ready and they’ll show two different types of shoes with their outfit and ask me which one works better. It’s so cool to be able to have that direct connection with someone who may be thousands of miles away. I’m definitely more focused on being available, being approachable and being someone who people feel comfortable reaching out to, knowing that I’m going to provide solid, honest feedback. I’m not about making people feel that fashion is unattainable or that I’m living some lavish lifestyle that is out of their reach.”

Now let’s talk campaigns. What are some of your favorite brands that you’ve worked with?

“I have an ongoing partnership with a brand called Greats, a Brooklyn-based sneaker company that is one of my favorite brands in general. They are awesome. I love what they do. I love their product. Their whole business model is great. They give me and my wife the freedom to really create some amazing content for them. We work together on a lot of stuff which is fun.”

Is there a brand you aspire to work with?

“In thinking about a brand that I would aspire to work with, as someone who loves sneakers, I would love to be able to collaborate with a shoe brand either on an existing product line or get involved from the ground up in the design process. I don’t look at it like, ‘I need to work with this brand,’ or ‘I need to work with that brand,’ it’s more of trying to be excited about the brands I am working with. Helping them while also being true to my brand and my values.”

What inspires you?

“The thing that inspires me most is being able to have an honest impact on people. Whether that’s giving them on idea on what they can be wearing or giving them more confidence to try a new hairstyle, whatever it is, I’ve been where they are before. Having an impact and helping people be the best version of themselves is what inspires me more than anything.”

Let’s talk about your peers, other male fashion influencers. Help me understand the relationship you have with them.

“Within the male fashion influencer space, it’s a pretty collaborative scene.  It’s not competitive, in my experience. Because I feel strongly that I want to provide as much value as possible, if it’s realistic to think someone else is going to provide more value for a specific style or brand, so be it. I would obviously love to get every job and work with everybody but that’s just not realistic. I don’t feel competitive but instead I feel inspired because many of the other influencers are just killing it. Many of them produce content that I follow that inspire me and give me ideas to tweak my content. I choose to look at it as a much more a motivational factor and to be excited for these guys and their success.  There have been opportunities where brands have come to other influencers and say ‘We actually need three more guys, can you recommend anyone?’ and because we have good relationships and they trust my ability, they offer my name to the brand. I’ve gotten several jobs because of this. I like to be up front and honest with my peers that we’re all in this together. This isn’t something we need to be fighting against one another.”

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The 150% Rule Of Influencer Marketing Budgets

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By Courtney Moser

 

“Will you accept this rose?”

This catchphrase is undeniably recognizable after more than twenty seasons of The Bachelor. But how does it relate to influencer marketing?

It all starts with matchmakers – of the love and business variety. The producers on The Bachelor choose 25 interested women who meet certain criteria to vie for the attention of the infamous bachelor. The Find Your Influence (FYI) team, on the other hand, chooses a number of influencers in their network who match brand-specific criteria (this varies depending on strategy and goals). From there, the brand has to decide which influencers they want to send offers to for campaign participation.

Just as the bachelor on TV hands out roses to the women he likes best, these brands send out invitations to influencers who match their criteria and reach their target audience. Because it’s a two-sided relationship (no thank you, unrequited love!), an invitation doesn’t automatically mean it’s a match. Some influencers may not be interested in the campaign topic, or may not respond in time for the start date, etc. To make up for this – and ensure that brands partner with influencers who truly care – the FYI team recommends sending out invitations to 150% of your campaign budget.

The 150% rule for influencer marketing budgets empowers brands with partnership choices. The influencers who accept quickly are more likely committed, engaged and easier to work with. If enough relevant influencers respond to your brand invite right away, you can shut off your campaign when you hit 100% of your budget goals in the FYI platform. Or, you can decide to up your budget as positive responses continue to roll in.

“The 150% rule offers brands more flexibility,” FYI CEO Jamie Reardon says. “It can open your campaign up to more success and increased influencer relationships in the future.”

Along with the above benefits, the rule also ensures you aren’t waiting on a few influencers and delaying the campaign. In business – and in love – you want to be with (work with) people who want to be with you. This mutual respect results in enthusiasm and authenticity.

As this Forbes articles says: “Influencer marketing works best when the influencer matches the brand, is in tune with the message, has control of the format, loves the content and knows whom he or she is working with.”

So, how many roses will you be doling out for your next campaign? Make sure your budget accounts for all of the possibilities!

To learn more about influencer marketing campaign strategies, read our blog.

 

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The Value Of Brand Ambassadors Vs. “One And Done” Customers

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By Courtney Moser

 

“True influence drives action, not just awareness.”

This quote from marketer Jay Baer illustrates a major difference between long-term brand ambassadors or advocates and one-time customers. Are you driving action or just awareness? What about your influencers? The key lies in your brand objectives and campaign strategy. Determining your intentions for an influencer marketing campaign will set the stage for everything that follows.

If you’re focused on pushing a specific product through a short-term campaign, for example, you’re likely to end up increasing awareness with one-time customers. But if you enter into a campaign with the idea that you’re building a relationship with influencers and connecting with future customers, you’re more likely to gain brand ambassadors and see long-term results down the road.

In fact, a recent study found that building brand ambassadors is the most effective influencer marketing strategy. Why? It takes us back to the basics of influencer marketing: the reason that its thriving over more traditional ads and methods. Effective influencers have an ongoing relationship with brands they admire and purchase from personally – increasing authenticity and trust with consumers (and ideally, future brand ambassadors!).

Influencer marketing isn’t just about selling products or services right now, it’s about increasing brand awareness, brand affinity and intent to purchase in the future. And this is done by way of meaningful connections with influencers and consumers (with mutually beneficial value) through quality content and genuine engagement.

“At its core, influencer marketing is the latest iteration of word-of-mouth marketing. You like something, you tell two people, they tell two people and so on,” said Find Your Influence founder Jamie Reardon.

The best influencers drive action – they spur their readers and followers to do something, rather than just listen. These actions vary, from following the brand online to clicking to their website to making a purchase to recommending the brand to more people. That wealth of possibilities illustrates the power of influencer marketing: Ultimately, the influencers you work with will become brand advocates or ambassadors, and inspire consumers to become them as well.

How can you help your influencers drive action? It goes back to your brand objectives and campaign strategy – make sure you’re giving them value and content worth sharing. And of course, choose the right influencers to represent your brand. Partnering with influencers you admire and trust – who bring something fresh to your brand – will make a long-term relationship easier.

“Businesses turn influencers into ‘brand advocates’ by providing them with personalized experiences that motivate them to share positive brand impressions with others,” as said in this MediaPost article.

By now, it should be clear why we recommend working with influencers who can deliver long-term results and inspire consumers to become brand advocates – instead of just “one and done” customers. After all, who doesn’t want long-lasting success?

If you have more questions about influencer marketing campaigns and strategy, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Find Your Influence team here.

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Does Your Campaign Length Meet Your Needs?

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By Courtney Moser

 

This campaign is too short… but that campaign is too long. How do you know which length is right for you?

Just as Goldilocks had to try several bowls of hot (and cold) porridge to find the one that was just right for her, marketers often have to use trial-and-error to determine the best campaign strategy and fit. And unlike Goldilocks, we don’t usually have three ready-to-eat campaigns lined up for us

So, where do we begin? First, ask what you’re trying to accomplish here. Before you can hone in on campaign length, you have to choose the influencer marketing campaign type that will best meet your brand needs and goals. These range from brand awareness campaigns to product launches and seasonal campaigns.

Once you’ve decided which campaign type will deliver the best results for your brand, you can start planning details such as number of influencers, content topics and campaign length. The length will vary depending on your strategy. This is where it may help to work with an influencer marketing group with experience to guide your brand.

The Find Your Influence team, for instance, has overseen the development and deployment of more than 10,000 influencer marketing campaigns – and they’ve come up with a recommended general nine-week plan for brands who don’t know where to start. This includes: two weeks to select and invite influencers, two weeks for influencers to develop content, four weeks for the campaign to be active and one week for reporting and analysis.

Brands who have specific campaign ideas in mind, however, will want to customize this plan to better fit company needs and timelines. For example, if you are going to run a blog campaign with several post parts and social promotion points, you may want to extend the active campaign time to allow for increased awareness and engagement. Or, if you are going for a front-loaded campaign that increases brand buzz the week before an event, you can shorten active campaign time for a more concentrated onslaught of content and social posts.

There are different benefits for each type of campaign and campaign length. Longer campaigns mean that you have more time to build relationships with your influencers and connect with consumers for increased authenticity. But, shorter campaigns can be just as effective in achieving those goals – and fast turnaround times can make a bang and help content trend on social media.

For more information about planning your influencer marketing campaign, read the FYI blog or contact our team today.

 

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How to Choose the Best Influencer Marketing Campaign for You

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By Courtney Moser

It’s estimated that we make 35,000 decisions every day.

Seriously, 35,000? We’re going to skip counting and just take their word for it! Regardless, at FYI we agree that we’re faced with constant options and divergent paths. Along with deciding what to eat, what to wear, and so on, we also have to make many business decisions.

Just within marketing, for example, there are countless choices that will impact your business. Where you should start when it comes to a marketing strategy? What channels you should use to achieve the best results? Influencer marketing can be an extremely valuable addition to your comprehensive marketing plan. Working with blogging or social media influencers can help you align with company goals, strategize creative campaigns and reach new audiences.

There are 150 million blog readers in the U.S alone, and 31.1 percent of consumers say that blogs influence their purchase decisions. Similarly, 57 percent of marketers say that they’ve acquired customers via their blog.

By increasing awareness of your brand or launching a new product through influencer marketing, you can drive traffic to your website and create buzz in the market. But which type of influencer marketing campaign is right for you? Following is a breakdown of four main campaign concepts we use at Find Your Influence (FYI) to help you decide.

  1. Brand Awareness – What is the meaning behind your company’s name, logo and slogan? Thanks to the evolution of the internet, brand awareness has become increasingly significant. The public is more equipped than ever, with mobile and social tools, to communicate quickly about your brand. This type of influencer marketing campaign focuses on increasing overall brand awareness. This strategy can help your brand reach exposure not only in your own backyard, but across the (digital) globe.
  1. Product Awareness – Influencer marketing can be a creative way to get your product in front of new and larger audiences. When a blogger vouches for your product and tells their readers how much they enjoy it, they are increasing your product’s visibility. A strong online presence, with positive reviews, can also enhance the company’s credibility.
  1. Product or Service Launch – Increase exposure and up the credibility of your brand with this influencer marketing strategy. If you’re launching a new product or service, influencers can help you create buzz, demonstrate best uses and get user feedback. A new flavor of tomato sauce, for example, can be cooked with and photographed in many different ways by various food bloggers.
  1. Seasonal Campaign – The holidays are the busiest times of the year, and influencer marketing offers an effective way to market and increase the success of your seasonal campaign. Some of the most popular posts for influencers are during the holiday season, as their readers are looking to them for guidance – whether it’s costume ideas, Thanksgiving recipes, gift guides and more.

Ultimately, choosing the right influencer campaign for you and your brand is crucial: The success of your campaign depends on it. Here at FYI, we’re experts in this space and we’re happy to help you pick the perfect campaign for your needs.

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Your 101 Guide to Influencer Marketing Campaigns

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By Courtney Moser

 

What’s influencer marketing?

Welcome to word-of-mouth marketing, on steroids. Any solid 101 guide starts with the absolute basics, just to ensure everyone’s on the same page.

Let’s ignore the illegal aspects of steroids for a minute, and appreciate the benefits. They inflate, or pump up, what was to be what is. It’s like giving that one old-school brand ambassador (“Sally, I’ve been using their shampoo for thirty years!”) a microphone and YouTube channel. All of a sudden – bam! – what was one person telling another is now one person reaching hundreds or thousands with the same message.

It’s clear, then, how great the potential impact of influencer marketing is for brands looking to increase awareness and drive sales.  The question changes from why to how – you understand the purpose and benefits, and would like to know how you can utilize this marketing strategy to spread your brand message. The following basic outline will help you launch your influencer marketing campaign.

 

Step 1: Identify your goals, budget + measurements

First things first, figure out what you’re trying to do. There are a variety of ways influencer marketing can help your brand, but it’s smart to focus on one or two to begin with. This will help you target the right influencers and craft campaign requirements that are concise and align with your brand strategy.

Here are a few examples of common influencer marketing goals:

  • Increase brand awareness
  • Drive more traffic to your website
  • Launch and promote a new product

Once you’ve landed on a goal, it’s time to think about measurements. Make sure you choose goals and metrics you can accurately track. Most campaigns will have a corresponding hashtag to track brand awareness on social networks. You can also provide your influencers with trackable links so that you can easily see how many people are clicking to your site or signing up for your mailing list. Another great way to track your campaign is with a promo code for a discount on your product.

With those measurements in mind, the same list of goals from above would look like this:

  • Increase brand awareness by expanding social reach by 30% using a branded hashtag
  • Bring 3,000 new clicks to a product-focused landing page
  • Launch new product with the goal of reaching 500,000 consumers

For a more detailed look at measurement, check out this blog post written by a Find Your Influence (FYI) co-founder.

Finally, figure out your budget. Influencer marketing can be a really affordable marketing option with a great ROI. But, you do have to pay your influencers. So set a budget before you reach out to them. Successful influencers have a brand of their own that they’re working to grow and maintain – they’re business people too. Make an offer and negotiate a rate. It will likely vary depending on expertise, followership and engagement rates. If setting a rate without proof of efficacy makes you uncomfortable, ask for the numbers. Influencers should be able to provide data points like traffic per day, social engagement rate and average reach.

 

Step 2:  Create your campaign

Once you’ve set your goals, budget and measurements, it’s time to choose a campaign concept. The type of campaign will stem from your strategy and goals, as addressed above.  What kind of campaign do you want to launch? How will it help you reach your goals? Following are a few common ideas:

  • Launch a series of sponsored blog posts with a streamlined topic or focus
  • Have a variety of influencers take over your Instagram for a short time
  • Throw a Twitter party

Part of your campaign concept should include the creation of a campaign brief outlining the details to give to your influencers. If your company requires contracts, legal approval and/or paperwork, this is also the time to get that worked out.

When you’re creating the campaign brief, you should include deadlines, hashtags, messaging requirements and suggestions, and anything else you can think of that might be helpful to your influencers. After you’ve picked influencers, you’ll send them the creative brief to begin your partnership. And that leads us to… choosing your influencers.

 

Step 3: Find + contact influencers

How do you find the right influencers for your campaign? Start searching, clicking and reading. You’re looking for engaging bloggers, social media superstars, video hosts, subject experts, and so on. This can take some time because you’re going to want to identify more influencers you need, as it’s likely that not all of them will agree to the campaign.

There are a few things to consider when you start contacting influencers. First of all, you want influencers who are already writing about topics that relate to your brand or industry. For instance, if you’re selling high heels, you probably shouldn’t be partnering with a blogger who writes primarily about sports — even if that blogger has a massive following. Partnering with influencers who don’t make sense for your brand can have a substantially negative impact on the success of your campaign.

While you’re looking for the right influencers, consider your goals. If you’re measuring reach, look for influencers who have an impressive (relevant!) social following. If you’re hoping to drive engagement, look for influencers who have a lot of comments on their blog and profiles. Surprisingly, these two don’t necessarily go hand in hand. An influencer with a smaller following might have better engagement than an influencer with a massive following. Both have their value.

 

Step 4: Track results + distribute payments

By this time, you’ve either launched your campaign or you’re ready to launch. Great work! But you’re not done yet. Now it’s time for tracking. Based on the detailed goals you’ve put together and the metrics discussed in this post, you know exactly how you’re going to be tracking the campaign.

Ensure your campaign has fully run its course before you start reporting on the data. Combine data points and try to gather key insights. Once you have it all together, provide feedback to your influencers. Let them know that they made an impact and are appreciated! This is also a good time to decide what you think worked well and what could have been done better so that you can improve your next campaign.

 

Does this seem like a lot of work? It is! That’s why we created a platform that helps you efficiently manage all of these steps and more. By using the Find Your Influence platform, you can search for influencers with keywords and other filters, draft campaign briefs, launch campaigns, track results and make one-click payments—all in one. We’ll save you time and money, and you’ll be working with industry experts who can help you launch a successful campaign.

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How to Leverage Multiple Platforms in an Influencer Marketing Campaign

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By Courtney Moser

The average digital consumer has seven social media accounts.

Yes, seven… on average. Let that sink in for a minute. That number has risen quickly from just three social accounts in 2012, according to Global Web Index, and is reason enough to leverage multi-platform marketing.

So what’s your social number? Seven accounts seem shockingly high at first, until you start counting. Between Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat and everything else, there’s an overwhelming number of platforms and ways in which to connect online.

This can be daunting enough for consumers, but what about brands? The increasing amount of social networks and types of influencers can determine how you handle your marketing strategy and efforts. Below we outline a few of the ways you can make the most of marketing on multiple platforms.

Multi-platform social campaigns

Marketing on several social platforms is now necessary in order to effectively reach more users spanning many networks. In fact, 81% of consumers say that friend’s social media posts have directly influenced purchase decisions. And, 78% say that a company’s social media posts have impacted their decisions. Increased visibility across networks means more opportunities to get your content in front of consumers.

The specific platforms you choose will depend on your target audience and your influencer’s audience demographics. It’s important to understand the difference between the users on social platforms – for instance, Facebook users span a wide variety of age groups, but more than half of Instagram’s users are between the ages of 18-29. A social retail campaign targeting females in their twenties, then, might be shared across Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

Blog campaigns

When working with blogging influencers, brands often let them choose which of their social platforms are most popular. Obviously, the main platform in this case is their blog, but most utilize other social networks to drive page views and engagement. Tylenol’s #WhatMattersMost campaign offers an excellent example of a multi-platform blog campaign. The brand asked blogging influencers to write about how they celebrate what matters most during the holidays, and then link to that content using the branded hashtag across social networks. The result was 36 blog posts that generated 112,251 unique views – plus 559 tweets, 206 Facebook likes and 334 Instagram posts.

Platform-specific campaigns

These campaigns are typically chosen to capitalize on a specific feature or demographic on a platform. Twitter parties, for instance, allow brands to connect quickly with consumers and follow conversations or host Q&A’s through branded hashtags. Or Facebook Live videos now offer a unique way for brands to “speak” with consumers in real time. Even if you’re running a platform-specific campaign, however, you can still promote it or link to it on other social platforms. You can spread the word about your Twitter party on other platforms to encourage followers to head over to your Twitter page on a certain day and time – increasing awareness and the number of participants tweeting.

To learn more about influencer marketing best practices and utilizing social platforms, check out all of the content on our blog. Plus, connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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How to Win Fans and Influence Consumers: Find the Right Influencers

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By Courtney Moser

It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.

Or is it? At FYI, we’d modify this piece of professional wisdom to read “It’s what you know and who you know,” but that wouldn’t be nearly as catchy. So instead, we’ll have to settle for explaining why both knowledge and connections matter in the world of influencer marketing.

Did you know, for example, that 92% of consumers turn to people they know for product or service referrals? And when it comes to retail research, 60% of consumers said they’ve consulted blogs or social media before shopping or making a purchase. This knowledge is critical in order to understand the importance of influencer marketing. You have to connect with the right influencers to be in front of the right eyes at the right time; to increase reach, awareness and engagement.

Ultimately, the goal of influencer marketing is to turn your influencers into brand advocates. To do this, you have to have a solid grasp on your own audience and know as much as you can about them: how old are they, what kind of blogs do they read, what are they interested in, and of course, why would they want your product or service? Then, you can connect with influencers who have similar interests, goals and high-reaching blogs or social platforms.

An influencer’s audience demographics should align with your target audience. Having this commonality provides a great starting point for cultivating an authentic relationship. Of course, relevance is just as important when it comes to content.Once you’ve found influencers who seem to fit with your brand, you should research their content and social networks. High-quality content is key when individuals are aligning themselves with your brand publicly. You want them to not only be creative and engaging, but professional and relevant as well.

So, how do you find the right influencers?

  1. Know your own audience
  2. Research their audience and content
  3. Add value and cultivate relationships

Don’t forget – this is all about relationships. It’s not just about brand sales or numbers, but adding value for influencers and consumers. As Forbes says: “When you select an influencer to work with, start by making an investment in them. Give them something worthy of sharing with their followers beyond samples and a product shot.”

Ready to learn more? Check out our best practices series here.

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